World Chess Federation - FIDE

Sunday, 25 April 2010

Rook Sac on chess.com

Enjoy!

a.n.other vs GJB

1.d4 Nf6
2.e3 d5
3.Bd3 Nc6
4.a3 e5
5.dxe5 Nxe5
6.Ne2 Bg4
7.f3 Bh5
8.O-O Bc5
9.Ng3 Bg6
10.Kh1 Qd7
11.Bxg6 hxg6
12.e4 d4
13.b4 Bb6
14.Bb2 O-O-O
15.Nd2 Rxh2+
16.Kxh2 d3
17.Nh1 Rh8+
18.Kg3 Nh5+
19.Kh2 Nf4+
20.Kg3 Nxg2
21.Kxg2 Qh3#

Opening a file on the Kingside?

Here is a recent game I played - but I'm not sure if my opponent gave me enough of a fight??

CW vs GJB
========
1. Nf3 d5
2. e3 Nf6
3. d4 Nc6
4. Be2 Bf5
5. 0-0 e6
6. c4 cxd
7. Bxc4 Nd5 (Not sure why I played this ... )
8. Nc3 Bg4
9. Nxd5 exd
10. Be2 Bd6
11. a3 ... (This seemed a little passive and unnecessary to me ... )
11. ... 0-0
12. Nd2 Bf5
13. Bf3 Re8
14. Bxd5 Bxh2+!
15. Kxh2 Qxd5
16. Qf3 Qd7
17. Rh1 ... (Now white will try and reposition the King and take advantage of the open file ... )
17. ... Bg4
18. Qg3 Re7
19. Nf3 Bxf3
20. Qxf3 Re8 (White cannot reposition his King to g1 because of (Nxd4 winning a pawn)
21. Bd2 Re6
22. g3 Rf6
23. Qg2 Qg4
24. Re1 Re6
25. d5 ... (The fork is a mirage ... !)
25. ... Rh6+
26. Kg1 Rxh1+
27. Qxh1 Rh6
28. Qg2 Ne5
29. Kf1 Nf3
30. Re2 Rh2 (Black's queen is a gonner !)
31. Qxh2 Nxh2+
32. Kg2? Qxe2

0 - 1

Monday, 19 April 2010

Michael De La Maza 7 circles

According to M De La Maza, you can improve your tactics by attempting the same set of problems repeatedly. The same set of problems are completed in circles. Each progressive circle is half the duration as the one before, presenting more of a challenge for each circle - but increasing familiarity of the patterns and nuturing speed of thought .. !

To Improve my tactics, I have so far completed 200 tactics problems from "303 Tricky Chess Tactics ... " in 2 weeks on the train. (A lot for me !!).

Therefore my circles will be as follow:

Duration Problems
Circle 1 14 Days 200
Circle 2 7 Days 200
Circle 3 3.5 Days 200
Circle 4 2 Days 200
Circle 5 1 Day 200
Circle 6 12 Hours 200
Circle 7 6 Hours 200

From the above you'll note that Circle 7 is going to be near impossible but I'll have a go !!!
I am due to start circle 2 tomorrow - this will last for 7 days ...

If you are interested to find out more visit the following ... http://www.amazon.co.uk/Rapid-Chess-Improvement-Study-Players/dp/1857442695/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1271694489&sr=8-1

Thursday, 15 April 2010

Great reference point for Openings ... !

Hi Steve (& Fellow Chess Tacticians!)

I thoroughly recomend Eco chess to use as a reference site for openings. Eco chess have very helpfully provided an alphabetical list of the most popular openings on their site. The good news is that I recognise most of them, but have to admit that I am very weak on opening theory!

There is a java applet on the site where you can play through the games on the site ...

http://www.ecochess.com/

I'll be using this site on a more regular basis (if I find the time .... !)


G

Wednesday, 14 April 2010

Black holds on with the Budapest ...

This was my first attempt at a Budapest in a club match. I am reading Tim Taylor's Everyman book at the moment to get some sharper lines for Black ...

SB vs GJB
========
1. d4 Nf6
2. c4 e5
3. dxe5 Ng4
4. Nf3 Nc6
5. Bf4 Bb4+
6. Nc3 Qe7
7. Qd5 d6
8. exd cxd
9. e3 Be6
10. Qd2 h6
11. a3 Bxc3
12. Qxc3 0-0
13. Be2 Nf6
14. Rd1 Rd8
15. 0-0 d5
16. Qc2 Rc8
17. Nd4 Nxd4
18. Rxd4 b4
19. b3 Qxa3
20. Rd1 Qc5
21. Qb1 Ne4
22. Qb2 g5
23. Bg3 Nxg3
24. hxg3 bxc
25. bxc Rb8
26. Qd2 Rb4
27. cxd Rxd4
28. Qxd4 Qxd4
29. Rxd4 Rxd5
30. Ra4

0.5 - 0.5

Wednesday, 7 April 2010

303 Tricky Chess Tactics

I found the following tactics puzzles exercise book very useful:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/303-Tricky-Chess-Tactics-Training/dp/1580420761/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1270649230&sr=8-1

I think it is aimed primarily at intermediate players ...

It could possibly be used as part of Michael De La Maza'a 7 circles training etc.

Piece activity can be rewarding ...

Queens Gambit Accepted

GJB vs CW
========
1. d4 d5
2. c4 Nf6
3. Nf3 cxd
4. Nc3 c6
5. a4 Qa5 (a premature queen move ... no other black pieces are in play)
6. Bd2 e6 (black will unleash his dark squared bishop)
7. Qc2 Bd6
8. e4 Bb4
9. Bxc4 Bxc3
10. Bxc3 Qh5
11. Bb4 (White aims to prevent Black from castling)
11. ... Qg4 (catching a pawn)
12. 0-0 Qxe4
13. Bd3 Qd5
14. Re1 Qd7
15. Ne5 Qxd4 (White blunders a pawn - but his pieces are all very active)
16. Ba3 (White maintains pressure on the a3-f8 diagonal to prevent Black from castling)
16. ... Nd7 (Black develops)
17. Nc4 Nc5
18. Rd1 b6 (White has set up a potential trap and Black is not at liberty to castle due to Bxh7+ winning the Black Queen)
19. Be2 Qf4 (Instead of Be2 - White should have looked at 19.Bxh7 with some sharp variations especially after 19. ... Qh4)
20. Bf3 Nd5 (Blocking the a3 bishop's path)
21. Bxd5 cxd5
22. Rxd5 (White is now only one pawn down taking advantage of the Black king's central position ... )
22. ... Bb7
23. Nd6+ Kf8
24. Rd1 Bd5 (Black attempts to ensnare the Knight on d6)
25. Bxc5 bxc5
26. Qxc5 g6
27. Rd4 (Looking at potential tactical tricks after Black queen has moved ... White has a discovered check ... )
27. ... Qg5 (threatens mate)
28. Nf5+ Kg8
29. Ne7+ Kg7
30. Nxd5 Rc8
31. Qe7 Qxe7
32. Nxe7 Rc7
33. Nxg6 (White piece is trapped an becomes a desperado piece ... White is now a pawn up! )
33. ... hxg6
34. b4 (and White had a won ending ... albeit difficult to convert)

1 - 0

Two Knights vs Two Rooks !

Anti Sicillian

CW - vs - GJB
==========
1. e4 - c5
2. Bc4 - d6
3. d3 - Nc6
4. Nf3 - Nf6
5. a3 - g6 (a3 is perhaps too premature
Black's knight will not be moving to b4 yet)
6. Nc3 - Bg7
7. 0-0 - 0-0
8. h3 - a6
9. Ne2 - e6
10. Bg5 - Qc7
11. Bxf6 - Bxf6 (Surely White is relinquishing the Bishop's useful pin without much of a fight? The Knights are onlookers - chatting away to each other seemingly unaware of hostilities... !)
12. c3 - b5
13. Ba2 - Rb8
14. Rb1 - b4
15. d4 - Qa5
16. d5 - exd5
17. Qxd5 - Be6
18. Qxc6 - Rb6
19. cxb - Bxa2
20. Qxe6 - Bxb1 (White should have taken the Queen with the pawn instead ... now he is one exchange down)
21. Qxf6 - Qb5 (Luckily Black can aim at one of the Knights to avoid loss of a piece Admittedly I found this move OTB rather than seeing 'x' no. of moves ahead)
22. Nc3? - (Forking Queen and Rook)
22. ... - Qxf1+ (A simple tactic winning another exchange!)
23. Kxf1 - Rxf6
24. Nxb1 - cxb
25. Ne5 - Rd8 (Black must always be aware of Knight forks ... but tees up a simple Rook check threat)
26. Ke2 - bxa
27. bxa - Rb6
28. Nc3 - Rb3 (Rook fork)
29. Nd5 - Rxa3
30. Nd3 - Kg7 (Black finds a better square for the King)
31. g4 - Ra2+
32. Ke3 - Ra3 (Pin)
33. h4 - a5
34. f4 - f5!
35. g5? - fxe4
36. Kxe4 - Rxd3 (Wins ! - on account of KxR Rxd5+)

White resigns ...

0 - 1

Tuesday, 6 April 2010

It is good to play kings gambit because...


It is good to play the kings gambit in most games,because if your opponent might go for taking the pawn.If he does,you can develop.It is important in games to develop,other wise,if you move the same piece all the time,all the other peices will just not get involved in the game.So remember to DEVELOP.
The picture bellow is me.










Friday, 2 April 2010

Two Knights vs Two Rooks !

Anti Sicillian

CW - vs - GJB
===============
1. e4 - c5
2. Bc4 - d6
3. d3 - Nc6
4. Nf3 - Nf6
5. a3 - g6 (a3 is perhaps too premature
black's knight will not be moving to b4 yet)
6. Nc3 - Bg7
7. 0-0 - 0-0
8. h3 - a6
9. Ne2 - e6
10.Bg5 - Qc7
11.Bxf6 - Bxf6 (Surely White is relinquishing the Bishop's useful pin
without much of a fight? The Knights are onlookers -
chatting away to each other seemingly unaware of hostilities... !)
12.c3 - b5
13.Ba2 - Rb8
14.Rb1 - b4
15.d4 - Qa5
16.d5 - exd5
17.Qxd5 - Be6
18.Qxc6 - Rb6
19.cxb - Bxa2
20.Qxe6 - Bxb1 (White should have taken the Queen with the pawn instead ...
now he is one exchange down)
21.Qxf6 - Qb5 (Luckily Black can aim at one of the Knights to avoid loss of a piece
Admittedly I found this move OTB rather than seeing 'x' no. of moves ahead)
22.Nc3? - (Forking Queen and Rook)

22. ... - Qxf1+ (A simple tactic winning another exchange!)
23.Kxf1 - Rxf6
24.Nxb1 - cxb
25.Ne5 - Rd8 (Black must always be aware of Knight forks ... but tees up a simple Rook check threat)
26.Ke2 - bxa
27.bxa - Rb6
28.Nc3 - Rb3 (Rook fork)
29.Nd5 - Rxa3
30.Nd3 - Kg7 (Black finds a better square for the King)
31.g4 - Ra2+
32.Ke3 - Ra3 (Pin)
33.h4 - a5
34.f4 - f5!
35.g5? - fxe4
36.Kxe4 - Rxd3 (Wins ! - on account of KxR Rxd5+)

White resigns ...

0 - 1

Another Scotch with 0-0-0 for Black

GJB vs CW
=========

1.e4 e5
2.Nf3 Nc6
3.d4 ed
4.Nxd4 Nxd4
5.Qxd4 b6
6.Bc4 (hoping that my opponent will play c5 and then I follow with Qd5 threatening mate or Qxa8)
6. ... Bb7
7.0-0 Qe7
8.Nc3 0-0-0
9.Bf4 Qc5
10.Qd3 (it is certainly not to White's advantage to trade queens in this position)
10. ... f6
11.Nb5 (the win of a pawn 'threat' is simple...)
11. ... Bd6
12. Bxd6 cxd6
13.Nxd6+ Kb8
14.Nxb7 (I have the option of winning the exchange in this position but opt to remove a defender of the Black King)
15.Bd5+ Kb8
16.Qa6 Qc7
17.Rad1 Ne7
18.Bb3 (again I don't want to encourage a potentially powerful knight from joining the game by swapping off!)
18. ... d6 (moving the Knight would surely have been better?)
19.Rd3 Qb7
20.Qa3 Qxe4 (a pawn grab ... )
21.Rxd6 Qb7
22.Rd1 Rc8
23.Rd7 Rc7?? (unfortunately a blunder due to ... Qxe7)
24.Qxe7 (Black Resigns)