World Chess Federation - FIDE

Tuesday, 31 July 2012

Reloader Tactic

Here is a technique to knockout your opponent quickly - 'the reloader tactic'. I initially saw examples of this tactic in Martin Weteschnik's excellent book, Understanding Chess Tactics. Admittedly I got a little lucky in this game (blitz 5 mins each) - I was busy tormenting my opponent's Queen when I realised just in time that I had my Knights ideally placed for the reloader ...

For those that are not sure what this is, essentially the reloader tactic involves sacrificing a piece (e.g. Knight-1) which MUST be taken due to the threat it poses ... but once this threat has been expunged then the same threat can be recreated (reloaded) with another piece of the same type or movement (e.g Knight-2).

In this game I used Knight-1 to create the first threat (my opponent resigned here but if Knight-1 had been eliminated then I could then have reloaded the threat with Knight-2!).

As usual - any comments welcome!!












PGN Viewer courtesy of http://chesstempo.com/

Sunday, 15 July 2012

Breaking down the walls ...

I have started playing Chess Genius Lite on my Android phone. I had an interesting game as White yesterday - admittedly Chess Genius only had 1 second per move, but it's a computer, so I have no sympathy for it!!! Here is the game I managed to win - a Pirc, and it shows readers the technique of throwing pieces at a defense in attempt to smash it down (I think it's called the Argentinian Attack...?) My mentality was simply 'no matter how many pieces it takes, if I can checkmate my opponent then I've achieved my objective, so keep the attack going!'.

As usual - any comments welcome!!












PGN Viewer courtesy of http://chesstempo.com/

Wednesday, 11 July 2012

20 Minute Exercise - Carlsen Game


Below is a link to the recent World Rapid and Blitz Championships in Astana. If you click on the link and scroll down you will find a game contested by Kazhgaleyev (W) and Carlsen (B). This one is a traditional e4 - e5 opening. If you follow the game through until about move 9. you find yourself deep into the middlegame. This is where you should start thinking about the plan, for your chosen colour. Let's say you choose Black ... Play move 9. for White but don't look at Black's next move. Instead, make a list of all the candidate moves for Black. Choose which you think are the 3 most promising. Now reason through each of the 3 candidate moves in turn to test that a) they are tactically sound and b) that they have a solid goal in mind ... The goal might be tactical - i.e. you can win a pawn or piece or it might be strategical - i.e. you can improve the position of one of your pieces with a further longer-term aim in mind ... Take 20 minutes maximum for this exercise.  Once this technique is perfected then you will become a great player!

http://www.chess.co.uk/twic/chessnews/events/world-rapid-and-blitz-championships-2012


Tuesday, 10 July 2012

Concept of open 'h' file

I lost many games online last night, but managed to win one in the end :) I remembered a concept that I'd seen on a DVD by Roman Dzindzichashvili. The idea is to sacrifice the Bishop on g5 and open the h file. I ended up with a Queen and Rook mate threat and plenty of time to capitalise on my opponent's uncastled King. Here is the game - a 5 minute Blitz.

As usual - any comments welcome!!












PGN Viewer courtesy of http://chesstempo.com/

Sunday, 8 July 2012

Petroff's Defence, Marshall Trap

Here is another one in this short series of chess traps. I feel it is worth learning these well known traps in case they are sprung against you ... You should always have a refutation ready if possible, which means that you will need to spend less time working out all the possible responses and more importantly avoid blundering!

Frank James Marshall (August 10, 1877 – November 9, 1944), was the U.S. Chess Champion from 1909–1936, and was one of the world's strongest chess players in the early part of the 20th century. He was born in New York City, and lived in Montreal, Canada from ages 8 to 19. He began playing chess at the age of 10 and by 1890 was one of the leading players in Montreal. He won the U.S. chess championship in 1904, but did not accept the title because the current U.S. champion, Harry Nelson Pillsbury, did not compete. Marshall was best known for his great tactical skill. One aspect of this was the "Marshall swindle", where a trick would turn a lost game around.

As usual - any comments welcome!!












PGN Viewer courtesy of http://chesstempo.com/

Saturday, 7 July 2012

Bogo-Indian Defence, Monticelli Trap

In this article I introduce you to a trick against the Bogo-Indian Defence. In the variation below it is still apparently possible for Black to draw after 10. ... Ne4! (but only if you have the skills and vision of Capablanca ...)

Here are some good opening variations for the Bogo-Indian Defence: http://chessopeningbogo-indiandefense.blogspot.co.uk/
As usual - any comments welcome!!












PGN Viewer courtesy of http://chesstempo.com/

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit - Halosar Trap

I have to admit that I don't think I've ever played the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit as White but perhaps I'd better start doing so ... ? This can be a trappy opening as the variation in this post proves.

The Blackmar–Diemer Gambit arose as a development of the earlier Blackmar Gambit, named after Armand Blackmar, a relatively little-known New Orleans player of the late 19th century who popularized its characteristic moves (1.d4 d5 2.e4 dxe4 3.f3) and was the first player to publish analysis on the opening in the chess literature."

Here are some lines in the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit ... This is very sharp and although White is said to have the advantage with the passed a-pawn, I expect it's still quite difficult to convert for White!

As usual - any comments welcome!!












PGN Viewer courtesy of http://chesstempo.com/

Friday, 6 July 2012

Blackburne Shilling Gambit Trap

Here is a gambit with a nice trap that Blackburne used to play ... but before this - an amusing anecdote concerning Joseph Henry Blackburne courtesy of Wikepedia:

Blackburne's fondness for drinking whisky at the board once led him to down an opponent's glass. Shortly afterwards, the opponent resigned, leading him to quip, "My opponent left a glass of whisky en prise and I took it en passant". In an interview with a liquor industry publication, Blackburne once claimed that drinking whisky cleared his brain and improved his chessplay."

Here is a line in the Blackburne Shilling Gambit. White elects to take the pawn on f7 with the Knight ... This is duly punished with a nice mate ...

As usual - any comments welcome!!












PGN Viewer courtesy of http://chesstempo.com/